Loading


Categories (x) > Networking > Switches (x)

Results 1-10 of 124 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • SFP Gigabit Managed Fiber Switch Eco, 28-Port, Quick Start Guide
    Quick Start Guide for the LGB5124A (Version 1)
 
  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • SFP Gigabit/10-Gigabit Managed Switch Eco (28-Port) QSG
    Quick Start Guide for the LGB5128A (Version 2)
 
  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • PoE+ Fast Ethernet Unmanaged Switch (8-Port) QSG
    Quick Start Guide for the LPB308A (Version 1)
 

Black Box Explains... GBICs

A Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) is a transceiver that converts digital electrical currents to optical signals and back again. GBICs support speeds of 1 Gbps or more and are typically... more/see it nowused as an interface between a high-speed Ethernet or ATM switch and a fiber backbone. GBICs are hot-swappable, so switches don’t need to be powered down for their installation. collapse


Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Modular Managed L2 Switch

  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • LPH1004A Series Hardened Ethernet PoE+ Switch QSG
    Quick Start Guide for the LPH1004A (Version 1)
 
  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • Unmanaged 802.3at PoE Gigabit Ethernet Switch, 5-Port, Quick Start Guide
    Quick Start Guide for the LPB1305A (Version 1)
 

Product Data Sheets (pdf)...LGH1000 Series Hardened Ethernet Switch—(4) 10/100/1000 Mbps, (1) GE SFP


Black Box Explains...Layer 2, 3, and 4 switching.

The Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model provides a layered network design framework that establishes a standard so that devices from different vendors work together.

Layer 2 (The Data-Link Layer)
Layer 2... more/see it nowswitches operate using physical network addresses. Physical addresses, also known as link-layer, hardware, or MAC-layer addresses, identify individual devices. Most hardware devices are permanently assigned this number during the manufacturing process.

Switches operating at Layer 2 are very fast because they’re just sorting physical addresses, but they usually aren’t very smart.

Layer 3 (The Network Layer)
Layer 3 switches use network or IP addresses that identify locations on the network. Physical addresses identify devices; network addresses identify locations. A location can be a LAN workstation, a location in a computer’s memory, or even a packet of data traveling through a network.

Network addresses are hierarchical. The more details included, the more specific the address becomes and the easier it is to find.

Switches operating at Layer 3 are smarter than Layer 2 devices and incorporate routing functions to actively calculate the best way to send a packet to its destination. However, because Layer 3 Switches take the extra time to read more details of a network address, they are sometimes much slower than Layer 2 Switches.

Layer 4 (The Transport Layer)
Layer 4 of the OSI Model coordinates communications between systems. Layer 4 identifies which application protocols (HTTP, SNTP, FTP, etc.) are included with each packet and uses this information to hand off the packet to the appropriate higher-layer software. Layer 4 switches make packet forwarding decisions based not only on the MAC address and IP address, but also on the application a packet belongs to.

Because Layer 4 devices enable you to establish priorities for network traffic based on application, you can assign a high priority to packets belonging to vital in-house applications, such as Peoplesoft®, with different forwarding rules for low-priority packets, such as generic HTTP-based Internet traffic.

Layer 4 switches also provide an effective wire-speed security shield for your network. collapse


Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Extreme Media Converter Switches

Results 1-10 of 124 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
Close

Support

Delivering superior technical support is our highest priority. Depending on the products or services we provide for you, please visit your appropriate support area.



 
Print
Black Box 1-877-877-2269 Black Box Network Services