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  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • ServSwitch%X99 Wizard QSG
    Quick Start Guide for the LPB2810A, LPB2826A, and LPB2848A (Version 2)
 

Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Gigabit Unmanaged Switches with SFP Uplinks


Black Box Explains...Ethernet hubs vs. Ethernet switches.

Although hubs and switches look very similar and are connected to the network in much the same way, there is a significant difference in the way they function.

What is a... more/see it nowhub?
An Ethernet hub is the basic building block of a twisted-pair (10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX) Ethernet network. Hubs do little more than act as a physical connection. They link PCs and peripherals and enable them to communicate over a network. All data coming into the hub travels to all stations connected to the hub. Because a hub doesn’t use management or addressing, it simply divides the 10- or 100-Mbps bandwidth among users. If two stations are transferring high volumes of data between them, the network performance of all stations on that hub will suffer. Hubs are good choices for small- or home-office networks, particularly if bandwidth concerns are minimal.

What is a switch?
An Ethernet switch, on the other hand, provides a central connection in an Ethernet network in which each connected device has its own dedicated link with full bandwidth. Switches divide LAN data into smaller, easier-to-manage segments and send data only to the PCs it needs to reach. They allot a full 10 or 100 Mbps to each user with addressing and management features. As a result, every port on the switch represents a dedicated 10- or 100-Mbps pathway. Because users connected to a switch do not have to share bandwidth, a switch offers relief from the network congestion a shared hub can cause.

What to consider when selecting an Ethernet hub:
• Stackability. Select a stackable hub connected with a special cable so you can start with one hub and add others as you need more ports. The entire stack functions as one device.
• Manageability. Choose an SNMP-manageable hub if you have a large, managed network.

What to consider when selecting an Ethernet switch:
• Manageability. Ethernet switches intended for large managed networks feature built-in management, usually SNMP.
• OSI Layer operation. Most Ethernet switches operate at “Layer 2,” which is for the physical network addresses (MAC addresses). Layer 3 switches use network addresses, and incorporate routing functions to actively calculate the best way to send a packet to its destination. Very advanced Ethernet switches, often known as routing switches, operate on OSI Layer 4 and route network traffic according to the application.
• Modular construction. A modular switch enables you to populate a chassis with modules of different speeds and media types. Because you can easily change modules, the modular switch is an adaptable solution for large, growing networks.
• Stackability. Some Ethernet switches can be connected to form a stack of two or more switches that functions as a single network device. This enables you to start with fewer ports and add them as your network grows. collapse

  • Manual... 
  • Web Smart Gigabit Ethernet Switch User Manual
    User Manual for the LGB708 (Version 1)
 
  • Manual... 
  • Gigabit Managed Switch User Manual
    User Manual for the LGB1108A, LGB1126A, and LGB1148A (Version 1)
 

Black Box Explains…Energy-Efficient Ethernet.

The IEEE 802.3az Ethernet standard, ratified in 2010, provides a standardized way for some Ethernet devices to reduce power consumption. Energy-Efficient Ethernet devices have a low-power idle (LPI) mode that... more/see it nowcan cut power use by 50% or more during periods of low data activity. Because energy-efficient Ethernet devices scale down power consumption when the load is lower, they save both the energy used to power processors and the energy used to cool them.

These energy savings are currently available for 100BASE-TX, 1000BASE-T, and 10GBASE-T Ethernet as well as some backplane Ethernet. 802.3az can be found on most types of network equipment, including NICs, switches, routers, and media converters. Because these devices are totally backwards compatible with other Ethernet devices, all you need to do to reap energy savings is to swap out devices. collapse

  • Manual... 
  • PoE+ Gigabit Managed Switch Eco User Manual
    User Manual for the LPB2810A, LPB2826A, and LPB2848A (Version 1)
 
  • Manual... 
  • Unmanaged 802.3af PoE Gigabit Ethernet Switch, 5-Port User Manual
    User Manual for Unmanaged 802.3af PoE Gigabit Ethernet Switch, 5-Port (1)
 
  • Manual... 
  • Gigabit Managed Switch CLI Guide
    CLI Guide for the LGB1126A and LGB1148A (Version 1)
 
  • Application Note... 
  • Ethernet Switches and ServSwitch Agility KVM-over-IP Extension
    The important interoperability considerations when choosing Ethernet switches for use with Agility systems. (Version 1)
 
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