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Black Box Explains... Bridges

If you work with legacy networks, you have doubtlessly encountered bridges. Bridges perform the same function as today’s switches in that they connect multiple network segments to create one homogenous... more/see it nownetwork, while keeping each segment isolated from the others.

Bridges operate on MAC-layer addresses and are protocol independent, so they transfer data between workstations without understanding the protocol. Since they don’t have to understand the protocol, they require little or no configuration.

Once you connect the bridge to the network, it automatically learns the addresses of all connected nodes and then creates an internal address table of this information.

When the bridge sees a packet, it checks the packet’s destination address against its internal list. If the address indicates the packet needs to be forwarded, the bridge passes the packet to the appropriate segment. If a bridge doesn’t know where a packet belongs—for example, when a station is first powered on—it passes on the packet.

Bridges can also distinguish between local data and remote data, so data traveling from one workstation to another in the same network doesn’t have to cross the bridge.

Although they are no longer in general use, Black Box stocks bridges for use as replacement parts in legacy networks. Replacing bridges with bridges rather than switches is often preferable because bridges are generally available with the BNC and AUI interfaces often found in older networks. Also, some bridges are able to link to other protocols such as RS-530 and X.21, enabling you to use these media to establish Ethernet network connections. collapse

  • Specification Sheet... 
  • Quick-Connect Surge Protector Spec Sheet
    Spec Sheet for SP602A (Version 1)
 
  • Manual... 
  • Remote MiniBridge
    Installation/User (Mar-99)
 

Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Media Conversion Center Modules


Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Mini and Micro Transceivers

  • Specification Sheet... 
  • Quick-Connect Surge Protector Spec Sheet
    Spec Sheet for SP606A (Version 1)
 

Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Pure Networking Wireless Adapters


Product Data Sheets (pdf)...2-Port Hub

  • Manual... 
  • Miniature Remote Fast Ethernet Bridges
    Installation/User (Oct-06)
 

Black Box Explains...Using repeaters to extend your network.

A repeater is a signal regenerator. It amplifies and regenerates received data and relays data from one length of cable to another—this can be between two segments of the same... more/see it nowcable type (such as UTP to UTP) or between two lengths of entirely different cable types (such as UTP to ThinNet). Because repeaters operate at the Data Link layer of the OSI model, having too many repeaters on a network introduces delays and causes problems with signal timing. Ethernet allows a maximum of two IRLs (InterRepeater Links) between any two devices and up to four per network. A hub also counts as a repeater. (If simple media conversion is your goal, use media converters instead. For details, contact Tech Suport.)

Repeaters boost distance by amplifying the signal.
A repeater actually regenerates and amplifies the signal to gain distance. The repeater not only changes the media type, it also gives the signal a boost to send it over a longer distance.

Repeaters boost distance through a change in media.
In addition to amplifying the signal, a repeater can also add distance to your network by enabling you to change to a media type such as fiber that supports longer distances. collapse

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