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  • Software... 
  • USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software for Debian
    Debian Software for the KVT100A (Version 11.0726)
 
  • Software... 
  • USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software for MAC
    MAC Software for the KVT100A (Version 11.0726)
 

Black Box Explains... Plasma vs. LCD Screens

When deciding whether to use plasma or liquid crystal diode (LCD) displays for your applications, you need to consider many factors. Both provide brilliant color, sharp text contrast, and crystal-clear... more/see it nowimages. But the way in which plasma and LCD screens process and display incoming video/computer signals is markedly different.

Compare and contrast.
Both plasma and LCD technology provide stark enough contrasts to make displays sharp and pleasing. But when it comes to contrast output, plasma technology outperforms LCD screens. Some plasma displays have a 3000:1 contrast ratio, which is the measure of the blackest black compared to the whitest white. LCDs use electric charges to untwist liquid crystals, thereby blocking light and emitting darker pixels. Despite this process, LCD displays don’t produce more than a 1000:1 contrast ratio.

Clarity that’s light waves ahead.
Pixels contain enough information to produce every color in the spectrum. Because plasmas use each and every pixel on their screens, color information is reproduced more accurately. Plasma screens display moving images with remarkable clarity, though burn-in can be an issue. For displays with lots of light and dark imagery, plasma panels provide excellent performance with their high-contrast levels, color saturation, and overall brightness.

LCD displays, on the other hand, manipulate light waves and reproduce colors by subtracting colors from white light. Though this makes it more difficult to maintain color accuracy and vibrancy compared to plasma screens, LCDs have an advantage with their higher-than-average number of pixels per square inch. These additional pixels make LCD technology better at displaying static images from computers or VGA sources in full-color detail. Plus, there’s no flicker and very little screen burn-in.

Applications with large amounts of data—such as those found on spreadsheets—display particularly well on LCD monitors.

Brilliant displays that go on and on.
With LCD screens, there are essentially no parts to wear out. LCD screens last as long as their backlights do, with displays lasting, on average, 50,000–75,000 hours. That’s why LCD screens are especially good for long-term applications, such as digital signage or displays that require around-the-clock use.

Plasma screens, however, use a combination of electric currents and noble gases (argon, neon, and xenon) to produce a glow, which in turn yields brilliant color. The half-life of these gases, however, is only around 25,000 hours. The glow they produce grows dimmer over time.

The right angle can make all the difference.
Plasmas light every pixel on the screen, making the brightness on the screen consistent and giving plasmas the edge when it comes to viewing angles. In fact, plasma screens have as much as a 160° viewing angle compared to LCDs. This makes viewing the images on the screen easier to see from a variety of angles. In doing so, however, plasmas consume much more power.

LCDs display at 130–140° angles, but their use of fluorescent backlighting requires much less power to operate than plasmas. This also makes LCDs less prone to burn-in or ghosting of images.
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  • Software... 
  • USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software for MAC OSX Lion 10.7
    MAC OSX Lion 10.7 Software for the KVT100A (Version 11.0830)
 

  • Software... 
  • USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software for MAC OSX Lion 10.7
    MAC OSX Lion 10.7 Software for the KVT100A (11.0830)
 
  • Manual... 
  • ServTray Complete, 17" Screen, with CATx Integrated KVM Tray Module Manual
    Manual for KVT417A Series and KVT517A Series (Version 1)
 
  • Manual... 
  • ServTray%X99 Complete, 15", Single-Port KVM Module (DVI, VGA, PS/2 or USB) User Manual
    User Manual for the KVT415A-1UV-R3 (Version 3)
 
  • Software... 
  • USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software for Linux
    Software for Linux, USB Laptop Console Crash Cart Adapter Software
 

Black Box Explains…Wizard.NET

One software solution to rule them all.
Wizard.NET is a professional enterprise management suite that delivers total IP device control, management, and connectivity. Black Box KVM over IP (KVMoIP) devices provide... more/see it nowthe ability to control large numbers of host computers from remote locations. When controlling larger groups of dispersed computers using numerous KVMoIP devices, the major challenge becomes one of management—retaining active control over a complex mix of devices, host computers, and registered users. Wizard.NET was developed as a common interface to help you remotely manage any number of KVMoIP devices together with all of their connected host computers and the access rights of the users.

Wizard.NET is delivered as a software solution only, and operates as a server application running on a system that can be completely separate from any of the KVMoIP devices?—?it merely requires an IP network or Internet connection. Wizard.NET uses an intuitive HTML user interface, which means that registered users can access and control it remotely using a standard Web browser. Like all Wizard KVMoIP products, Wizard.NET employs high specification security techniques to ensure that only authorized users may gain access.

Wizard.NET has two main modules, the manager and the connector. The manager module is accessible only to managers and administrators. It is where the details about all connected devices, hosts, and users are configured and stored. The connector module can be used by registered users to enable quick access to all of the targets for which they have access rights. Targets may be devices, hosts, or device groups as appropriate.

To ensure maximum security, Wizard.NET does not retain any passwords within its database for the devices that it controls. Instead, a valid password is used once only to gain access to each device during the “acquire” stage, when Wizard.NET establishes a Secure Ticket with the device. In all subsequent accesses to each device, the relevant secure ticket is used to gain access. collapse

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