Loading


Categories (x) > Industrial > Cabling & Infrastructure (x)

Results 81-90 of 159 << < 6 7 8 9 10 > >> 
  • Pdf Drawing... 
  • GigaStation2 SC Simplex Snap Fitting, Office White PDF Drawing
    PDF Drawing for FMT343-R3 (Version 1)
 

Black Box Explains... Pulling eyes and fiber cable.

Fiber optic cable can be damaged if pulled improperly. Broken or cracked fiber, for example, can result from pulling on the fiber core or jacket instead of the strength member.... more/see it nowAnd too much tension or stress on the jacket, as well as too tight of a bend radius, can damage the fiber core. If the cable’s core is harmed, the damage can be difficult to detect.

Once the cable is pulled successfully, damage can still occur during the termination phase. Field termination can be difficult and is often done incorrectly, resulting in poor transmission. One way to eliminate field termination is to pull preterminated cable. But this can damage the cable as well because the connectors can be knocked off during the pulling process. The terminated cable may also be too bulky to fit through ducts easily. To help solve all these problems, use preterminated fiber optic cable with a pulling eye. This works best for runs up to 2000 feet (609.6 m).

The pulling eye contains a connector and a flexible, multiweave mesh-fabric gripping tube. The latched connector is attached internally to the Kevlar®, which absorbs most of the pulling tension. Additionally, the pulling eye’s mesh grips the jacket over a wide surface area, distributing any remaining pulling tension and renders it harmless. The end of the gripping tube features one of three different types of pulling eyes: swivel, flexible, or breakaway.

Swivel eyes enable the cable to go around bends without getting tangled. They also prevent twists in the pull from being transferred to the cable. A flexible eye follows the line of the pull around corners and bends, but it’s less rigid. A breakaway eye offers a swivel function but breaks if the tension is too great. We recommend using the swivel-type pulling eye.

A pulling eye enables all the fibers to be preterminated to ensure better performance. The terminated fibers are staggered inside the gripping tube to minimize the diameter of the cable. This enables the cable to be pulled through the conduit more easily. collapse

  • Pdf Drawing... 
  • GigaBase 350 CAT5e, 350-MHz Solid Bulk Cable (Plenum, Red) PDF Drawing
    PDF Drawing of the EYN848A-PB-1000 (1)
 

Black Box Explains...Breakout-style cables.

With breakout- or fanout-style cables, the fibers are packaged individually. A breakout cable is basically several simplex cables bundled together in one jacket. Breakout cables are suitable for riser and... more/see it nowplenum applications, and conduit runs.

This differs from distribution-style cables where several tight-buffered fibers are bundled under the same jacket.

This design of the breakout cable adds strength to the cable, although that makes it larger and more expensive than distribution-style cables.

Because each fiber is individually reinforced, you can divide the cable into individual fiber lines. This enables quick connector termination, and eliminates the need for patch panels.

Breakout cable can also be more economical because it requires much less labor to terminate.

You may want to choose a cable that has more fibers than you actually need in case of breakage during termination or for future expansion. collapse

  • Pdf Drawing... 
  • GigaBase 350 CAT5e Patch Cable with Snagless Boots (Pink) PDF Drawing
    PDF Drawing of EVNSL86 series
 

Product Data Sheets (pdf)...Multimode, 50-Micron, Distribution-Style Bulk Fiber Optic Cable

  • Pdf Drawing... 
  • GigaBase 350 CAT5e, 350-MHz Solid Bulk Cable (Plenum, Black) PDF Drawing
    PDF Drawing of the EYN860A-PB-1000 (1)
 
  • Pdf Drawing... 
  • GigaTrue CAT6 Channel 550-MHz Patch Cable (UTP) with Snagless Boots (Gray) PDF Drawing
    PDF Drawing of the EVNSL640 Series
 

Black Box Explains...Fiber optic cable construction.

Fiber optic cable consists of a core, cladding, coating, strengthening fibers, and cable jacket.

Core
This is the physical medium that transports optical data signals from an attached light source to... more/see it nowa receiving device. The core is a single continuous strand of glass or plastic that’s measured (in microns) by the size of its outer diameter. The larger the core, the more light the cable can carry.

All fiber optic cable is sized according to its core’s outer diameter.

The three multimode sizes most commonly available are 50, 62.5, and 100 microns. Single-mode cores are generally less than 9 microns.

Cladding
This is a thin layer that surrounds the fiber core and serves as a boundary that contains the light waves and causes the refraction, enabling data to travel throughout the length of the fiber segment.

Coating
This is a layer of plastic that surrounds the core and cladding to reinforce the fiber core, help absorb shocks, and provide extra protection against excessive cable bends. These buffer coatings are measured in microns (µ) and can range from 250 to 900 microns.

Strengthening fibers
These components help protect the core against crushing forces and excessive tension during installation.

The materials can range from Kevlar® to wire strands to gel-filled sleeves.

Cable jacket
This is the outer layer of any cable. Most fiber optic cables have an orange jacket, although some types can have black or yellow jackets. collapse

  • Video...Counterfeit Cable

    Watch this informative, 3-minute video to learn how to identify counterfeit cable. Andy Schmeltzer, the "Cable Guy" at Black Box, explains what to look for when you purchase cable. Some... more/see it nowtip-offs that a cable may be non-compliant or counterfeit can include a price that seems too good to be true, specs or lack thereof, a lighter weight than expected, and more. collapse

Results 81-90 of 159 << < 6 7 8 9 10 > >> 
Close

Support

Delivering superior technical support is our highest priority. Depending on the products or services we provide for you, please visit your appropriate support area.



 
Print
Black Box 1-877-877-2269 Black Box Network Services