Loading


Categories (x) > Datacom (x)
Content Type (x) > Black Box Explains (x)

Results 31-40 of 47 < 1 2 3 4 5 > 

Black Box Explains…Fiber Ethernet adapters vs. media converters.

When running fiber to the desktop, you have two choices for making the connection from the fiber to a PC: a fiber Ethernet adapter or a media converter like our... more/see it nowMicro Mini Media Converter.

Fiber Ethernet adapters:

  • Less expensive.
  • Create no desktop clutter, but the PC must be opened.
  • Powered from the PC—require no separate power provision.
  • Require an open PCI or PCI-E slot in the PC.
  • Can create driver issues that must be resolved.
  • May be required in high-security installations that require a 100% fiber link to the desktop.

  • Media converters:
  • More expensive.
  • No need to open the PC but can create a cluttered look.
  • Powered from an AC outlet or a PC’s USB port.
  • Don’t require an open slot in the PC.
  • Plug-and-play installation—totally transparent to data, so there are no driver problems; install in seconds.
  • The short copper link from media converter to PC may be a security vulnerability.
  • collapse


    Black Box Explains...DIN rail.

    DIN rail is an industry-standard metal rail, usually installed inside an electrical enclosure, which serves as a mount for small electrical devices specially designed for use with DIN rails. These... more/see it nowdevices snap right onto the rails, sometimes requiring a set screw, and are then wired together.

    Many different devices are available for mounting on DIN rails: terminal blocks, interface converters, media converter switches, repeaters, surge protectors, PLCs, fuses, or power supplies, just to name a few.

    DIN rails are a space-saving way to accommodate components. And because DIN rail devices are so easy to install, replace, maintain, and inspect, this is an exceptionally convenient system that has become very popular in recent years.

    A standard DIN rail is 35 mm wide with raised-lip edges, its dimensions outlined by the Deutsche Institut für Normung, a German standardization body. Rails are generally available in aluminum or steel and may be cut for installation. Depending on the requirements of the mounted components, the rail may need to be grounded. collapse


    Black Box Explains... Basic Printer Switches

    Mechanical—A mechanical switch is operated by a knob or by push buttons and uses a set of copper or gold-plated copper contacts to make a connection. The internal resistance created... more/see it nowby this type of connection will affect your signal’s transmission distance and must be taken into account when calculating cable lengths.

    Electronic—Although electronic switches are controlled by knobs and pushbuttons like mechanical switches, the switching is accomplished with electronic gates not mechanical contacts. Electronic switches don’t have the internal resistance of a mechanical switch—some even have the ability to drive signals for longer distances. And since they don’t generate electronic spikes like mechanical switches, they’re safe for sensitive components such as HP® laser printers. Some electronic switches can be operated remotely. collapse


    Black Box Explains...Modem eliminators.

    Understanding the process of elimination.
    If your office environment has sync equipment, and if that equipment is also used for local data communications, you should consider replacing those modems with cost-effective... more/see it nowand versatile modem eliminators.

    What does a modem eliminator do?
    One modem eliminator can connect a local terminal and computer port in lieu of the pair of modems that they would normally connect to. Plus, a modem eliminator enables DCE-to-DTE data and control-signal connections that are not easily achieved by standard cables or connectors in a sync environment.

    Basically, a modem eliminator simulates a sync data link. It does this two ways. First, it provides clocking, which is mandatory for sync devices to communicate. Second, it provides the handshaking that DCEs do.

    Why should you use a modem eliminator?
    One—if you have two sync DTEs in the same room or close to each other, you will need a modem eliminator.

    Two—if you have a network with routers, you just found the perfect equipment tester.

    A modem eliminator can enable in-house bench testing of routers or existing equipment. There’s no need to place routers all over your network only to find out they don’t work once you test the LAN. A modem eliminator tells you what equipment passes your tests before you install.

    Three—a modem eliminator makes good economic sense. One does the job of two modems—and it does the job better. You get a high return on your investment. collapse


    Black Box Explains...Types of KVM switches.

    Black Box has the keyboard/video switches you need to share one CPU between several workstations or to control several CPUs from one monitor and keyboard.

    If you do a lot of... more/see it nowswitching, you need premium switches—our top-of-the-line ServSwitch™ KVM switches give you the most reliable connections for the amount of KVM equipment supported. With ServSwitch KVM switches, you can manage as many CPUs as you want from just one workstation, and you can access any server in any computer room from any workstation. Eliminating needless equipment not only saves you money, it also gives you more space and less clutter. Plus, you can switch between PCs, Sun®, and Mac® CPUs. ServSwitch KVM switches can also cut your electricity and cooling costs because by sharing monitors, you use less power and generate less heat.

    If your switching demands are very minor, you may not need products as advanced as ServSwitch. Black Box offers switches to fill less demanding needs. Most of these are manual switches or basic electronic switches, which don’t have the sophisticated emulation technology used by the ServSwitch.

    For PCs with PS/2® keyboards, try our Keyboard/Video Switches. They send keyboard signals, so your CPUs boot up as though they each have their own keyboard.

    With the RS/6000™ KVM Switch, you can run up to six RS/6000 servers from one workstation. Our Keyboard/ Video Switch for Mac enables you to control up to two Mac CPUs from one keyboard and monitor.

    With BLACK BOX® KVM Switches, you can share a workstation with two or four CPUs. They’re available in IBM® PC and Sun Workstation® configurations.

    You’ll also find that our long-life manual Keyboard/Video Switches are perfect for basic switching applications. collapse


    Black Box Explains...Code-operated and matrix switches.

    Code-operated and matrix switches from Black Box give you computer-controlled switching for a variety of applications.

    Code-operated switches
    BLACK BOX® Code-Operated Switches enable one device to control up to 64 connected devices,... more/see it nowdepending on the code-operated switch. For instance, you can use one modem—not eight—to control eight devices. Code-operated switches are ideal for applications that require remote switching for file sharing or monitoring. Use code-operated switches for:
    • Remote programming. Call in via remote sites to access servers, logic controllers, or any devices that require programming.
    • Diagnostics. From your master control room, you can probe servers and run diagnostics.

    Matrix switches
    Matrix switches enable more than one device to control other devices. Any port can connect to any port and perform more than one operation at a time independently. The code-operated switches talk to only one slave port at a time.

    For instance, if your operation has four computers that need to share two printers and one modem, a matrix switch is what you need to handle the job. Use matrix switches for:
    • Industrial applications. You can download instructions remotely to more than one programmable logic controller.
    • Data sharing. PCs or industrial devices can be connected—locally or remotely—to other PCs and industrial devices or for file swapping. collapse


    Black Box Explains... PCI buses

    A Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Bus enhances both speed and throughput. A PCI Local Bus is a high-performance bus that provides a processor-independent data path between the CPU and high-speed... more/see it nowperipherals. PCI is a robust interconnect interface designed specifically to accommodate multiple high-performance peripherals for graphics, full-motion video, SCSI, and LANs. collapse


    USB 3.0

    The newest USB standard, USB 3.0 or “SuperSpeed USB," provides vast improvements over USB 2.0. USB 3.0 promises speeds up to 5 Gbps, about ten times that of USB 2.0.... more/see it now

    USB 3.0 uses a sync-n-go technology that minimizes user wait time. USB 3.0 adds a physical bus running in parallel with the existing 2.0 bus. It has the flat USB Type A plug, but inside there is an extra set of connectors, and the edge of the plug is blue instead of white. The Type B plug looks different with an extra set of connectors.

    USB 3.0 cable contains nine wires, four more than USB 2.0, which has one pair for data and one pair for power. USB 3.0 adds two more data pairs, for a total of eight plus a ground. These extra pairs enable USB 3.0 to support bidirectional asynchronous, full-duplex data transfer instead of USB 2.0’s half-duplex polling method.

    USB 3.0 is much more power efficient than USB 2.0. It provides 50% more power than USB 2.0 (150 mA vs 100 mA) to unconfigured devices and up to 80% more power (900 mA vs 500 mA) to configured devices. It is also better at conserving power, when compared to USB 2.0, which uses power when the cable or device isn’t being used. With USB 3.0, when devices are idle, it doesn't broadcast packets or perform polling.

    USB 3.0 is completely backwards compatible with USB 2.0. Applications built to the USB 2.0 spec will work seamlessly with USB 3.0. collapse


    Black Box Explains...10-Gigabit Ethernet.

    10-Gigabit Ethernet (10-GbE), ratified in June 2002, is a logical extension of previous Ethernet versions. 10-GbE was designed to make the transition from LANs to Wide Area Networks (WANs) and... more/see it nowMetropolitan Area Networks (MANs). It offers a cost-effective migration for high-performance and long-haul transmissions at up to 40 kilometers. Its most common application now is as a backbone for high-speed LANs, server farms, and campuses.

    10-GbE supports existing Ethernet technologies. It uses the same layers (MAC, PHY, and PMD), and the same frame sizes and formats. But the IEEE 802.3ae spec defines two sets of physical interfaces: LAN (LAN PHY) and WAN (WAN PHY). The most notable difference between 10-GbE and previous Ethernets is that 10-GbE operates in full-duplex only and specifies fiber optic media.

    At a glance—Gigabit vs. 10-Gigabit Ethernet

    Gigabit
    • CSMA/CD + full-duplex
    • Leveraged Fibre Channel PMDs
    • Reused 8B/10B coding
    • Optical/copper media
    • Support LAN to 5 km
    • Carrier extension

    10-Gigabit Ethernet
    • Full-duplex only
    • New optical PMDs
    • New coding scheme 64B/66B
    • Optical (developing copper)
    • Support LAN to 40 km
    • Throttle MAC speed for WAN
    • Use SONET/SDH as Layer 1 transport

    The alphabetical coding for 10-GbE is as follows:
    S = 850 nm
    L = 1310 nm
    E = 1550 nm
    X = 8B/10B signal encoding
    R = 66B encoding
    W = WIS interface (for use with SONET).

    10-GbE
    10GBASE-SR — Distance: 300 m; Wavelength: 850 nm; Cable: Multimode
    10GBASE-SW — Distance: 300 m; Wavelength: 850 nm; Cable: Multimode
    10GBASE-LR — Distance: 10 km; Wavelength: 1310 nm; Cable: Single-Mode
    10GBASE-LW — Distance: 10 km; Wavelength: 1310 nm; Cable: Single-Mode
    10GBASE-LX4 — Distance: Multimode 300 m, Single-Mode 10 km; Wavelength: Multimode 1310 nm, Single-Mode WWDM; Cable: Multimode or Single-Mode
    10GBASE-ER — Distance: 40 km; Wavelength: 1550 nm; Cable: Single-Mode
    10GBASE-EW — Distance: 40 km; Wavelength: 550 nm; Cable: Single-Mode
    10GBASE-CX4* — Distance: 15 m; Wavelength: Cable: 4 x Twinax
    10GBASE-T* — Distance: 25–100 m; Wavelength: Cable: Twisted Pair
    * Proposed for copper. collapse


    Black Box Explains...IRQs, COM Ports, and Windows

    Windows® 95 normally requires each serial port to have its own unique Interrupt Request Line (IRQ). However, if you use a third-party communications driver that supports IRQ sharing, you can... more/see it nowshare interrupts. Unfortunately, data throughput will not be as high as with single interrupt port configurations.

    With Windows NT®, you can share interrupts across multiple ports as long as the serial ports have an Interrupt Status Port (ISP) built into the card.

    The Interrupt Service Routine, a software routine that services interrupts and requests processor time, reads the ISP and is immmediately directed to the port that has an interrupt pending. Compared to the polling method used if the serial ports don’t have an ISP, this feature can determine which port generated the interrupt up to four times more efficiently—and it almost eliminates the risk of lost data. Windows NT supports the ISP by enabling the user to configure the registry to match the card’s settings. Black Box models IC102C-R3, IC058C, and IC112C-R3 all have ISPs and come with a Windows NT setup utility to simplify installation and configuration.

    If your serial port doesn’t have an ISP, the Interrupt Service Routine has to poll each port separately to determine which port generated the interrupt. collapse

    Results 31-40 of 47 < 1 2 3 4 5 > 
    Close

    Support

    Delivering superior technical support is our highest priority. Depending on the products or services we provide for you, please visit your appropriate support area.



     

    You have added this item to your cart.

    Important message about your cart:

    You requested more of "" than the currently available. The quantity has been changed to them maximum quantity available. View your cart.

    Print
    Black Box 1-800-316-7107 Black Box Network Services