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Black Box Explains...V.35, the Faster Serial Interface.

V.35 is the ITU (formerly CCITT) standard termed “Data Transmission at 48 kbps Using 60–108 KHz Group-Band Circuits.“

Basically, V.35 is a high-speed serial interface designed to support both higher data... more/see it nowrates and connectivity between DTEs (data-terminal equipment) or DCEs (data-communication equipment) over digital lines.

Recognizable by its blocky, 34-pin connector, V.35 combines the bandwidth of several telephone circuits to provide the high-speed interface between a DTE or DCE and a CSU/DSU (Channel Service Unit/Data Service Unit).

Although it’s commonly used to support speeds ranging anywhere from 48 to 64 kbps, much higher rates are possible. For instance, maximum V.35 cable distances can theoretically range up to 4000 feet (1200 m) at speeds up to 100 kbps. Actual distances will depend on your equipment and cable.

To achieve such high speeds and great distances, V.35 combines both balanced and unbalanced voltage signals on the same interface. collapse

  • Manual... 
  • Fiber Optic Multipoint Line Driver-ST
    Installation and User guide (Feb-98)
 

Black Box Explains...T1 and E1 benefits.

If you manage a heavy-traffic data network and you demand high bandwidth for high speeds, Black Box has what you need to send your data digitally over super-fast T1 or... more/see it nowE1 communication lines.

Both T1 and E1 are foundations of global voice communication.
Developed more than 30 years ago and commercially available since 1983, T1 and E1 go virtually anywhere phone lines go, but faster. T1 sends data up to 1.544 Mbps. E1 supports speeds to 2.048 Mbps. No matter where you need to connect—North, South, or Central America, Europe, or the Pacific Rim—T1 and E1 can get your data there—fast!

Both services provide flexibility for a multitude of applications. Whether you need to drive a private, point-to-point line or a high- speed circuit, provide corporate access to the Internet or inbound access to your own webserver, or support a voice/data/fax/video WAN that extends halfway around the world, T1 or E1 can make the connection.

Both offer cost-effective connections.
In recent years, competition among telco service providers has led to increasingly more affordable prices for T1 and E1 services. In fact, most companies seriously considering a shift to T1 or E1 will find they can negotiate even better rates with just a little comparative cost analysis.

Some typical applications include:
• Accessing public Frame-Relay networks or public switched telephone networks for voice and fax.
• Merging voice and data traffic. A single T1 or E1 line can give you several additional voice and data lines at no additional cost.
• Making LAN connections. If you’re linking LANs, a T1 or E1 line offers excellent performance.
• Sending bandwidth-intensive data such as CAD/CAM, MRI, CAT-scan images, and other graphics with large files. collapse

  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • USB 2.0 Ultimate Extender (CAT5, 1-Port) Quick Start Guide
    Quick Start Guide for the IC401A (Version 2)
 

Black Box Explains...RS-232.

RS-232, also known as RS-232C and TIA/EIA-232-E, is a group of electrical, functional, and mechanical specifications for serial interfaces between computers, terminals, and peripherals. The RS-232 standard was developed by... more/see it nowthe Electrical Industries Association (EIA), and defines requirements for connecting data communications equipment (DCE)—modems, converters, etc.—and data terminal equipment (DTE)—computers, controllers, etc.) devices. RS-232 transmits data at speeds up to 115 Kbps and over distances up to 50 feet (15.2 m).

The standard, which is functionally equivalent to ITU V.24/V.28, specifies the workings of the interface, circuitry, and connector pinning. Both sync and async binary data transmission fall under RS-232. Although RS-232 is sometimes still used to transmit data from PCs to peripheral devices, the most common uses today are for network console ports and for industrial devices.

Even though RS-232 is a “standard,” you can’t necessarily expect seamless communication between two RS-232 devices. Why? Because different devices have different circuitry or pinning, and different wires may be designated to perform different functions.

The typical RS-232 connector is DB25, but some PCs and other data communication devices have DB9 connectors and many newer devices have RJ-45 RS-232 ports. To connect 9-pin PC ports or RJ-45 to devices with 25-pin connectors, you will require a simple adapter cable. collapse



Black Box Explains...Selecting fiber line drivers.

When choosing a fiber driver, you should make a power budget, calculate the speed and distance of your cable run, and know the interface requirements of all your devices.

Many of... more/see it nowour fiber drivers are for single-mode fiber optic cable. Compared to multimode fiber, single-mode delivers up to 50 times more distance. And single-mode at full-duplex enables up to two times the data throughput of multimode fiber. collapse

  • Quick Start Guide... 
  • Industrial Opto-Isolated RS-232 Repeater Quick Start Guide
    Quick Start Guide (QSG) for the ICD201A
 


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